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  • Sustainable Operations Series: Healthy Food in Health Care - Putting Sustainability on the Menu

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 4/30/2014: Learn about the environmental and public health benefits of purchasing sustainably produced food. Hear case study examples from across the country of hospitals increasing their sustainable food purchasing efforts. Be introduced to key resources for goal setting, implementing, tracking and reporting for successful hospital sustainable food purchasing initiatives.

    Session Description

    By prioritizing sustainable food, hospitals can move the food system in a more sustainable direction; improve the health of their patients, staff, and visitors; and invest in the well-being of communities and the environment. The way food is produced, processed, distributed, and consumed has significant impacts on human health, climate change, air and water pollution, and the viability of future agricultural production. In this session we will explore these environmental and public health motivations for building sustainable food purchasing initiatives at hospitals and hear about hospitals in California, Washington and New England working on increasing their purchasing of a range of food product categories from produce to meat and seafood, and the strategies and key resources they used to create these successful programs.

    Learning Objectives

    • Learn about the environmental and public health benefits of purchasing sustainably produced food.
    • Hear case study examples from across the country of hospitals increasing their sustainable food purchasing efforts.
    • Be introduced to key resources for goal setting, implementing, tracking and reporting for successful hospital sustainable food purchasing initiatives.

    Presenters

    Kathy Pryor, MA, Washington Healthy Food in Health Care Project

    Kathy Pryor is the Washington State Healthy Food in Health Care Program Director for Health Care Without Harm. She has a Masters in Environment & Community with a focus in Local & Sustainable Food Systems, and has worked on food issues with Food & Water Watch, Washington Toxics Coalition, and Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility. She is the author of the children's book "Sylvia's Spinach" and the forthcoming "Zora's Zucchini".


    Kendra Klein, California Healthy Food in Health Care Project

    Kendra Klein is a writer, researcher, and advocate whose work focuses on the nexus of sustainable food systems and public health. She is a Senior Program Associate at Physicians for Social Responsibility where she coordinates the California Healthy Food in Health Care program of Health Care Without Harm. Klein received her PhD from the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at UC Berkeley. Her research examined the movement toward environmental nutrition in the health care sector, including supply chain issues related to hospital sourcing of sustainable foods. Klein worked on a variety of environmental health campaigns as a community organizer and program associate at the national non-profit organization Breast Cancer Action, including chemical policy reform, corporate accountability related to pink ribbon fundraising, and precautionary principle implementation. She has apprenticed on organic farms in California and Hawaii and ran a Farm & Garden summer program at Children's Day School in San Francisco. Klein is a 2011 Switzer Environmental Fellow and has written for The Nation, Environmental Politics, and Civil Eats. She holds a bachelors degree in Interdisciplinary Studies with a focus in Environmental Studies from Miami University of Ohio.

    John Stoddard, New England Healthy Food in Health Care Project

    John Stoddard, MS. is a Healthy Food in Health Care Coordinator for the global non-profit organization, Health Care Without Harm. He works throughout New England on facilitating local and sustainable food procurement for health care institutions, with a specific focus on Connecticut and Rhode Island. Prior to joining the New England team, John worked on these efforts in Oregon through the Oregon Center for Environmental Health. John began his career in the waste reduction field, working with institutions and municipalities to decrease their landfill bound waste.

    He has experience as an independent sustainability consultant to Boston restaurants, and is a founder of Higher Ground Farm, a Boston-based urban agriculture company that grows food on rooftops and other urban spaces. He earned his Master of Science from Tufts University’s Friedman School of Nutrition specializing in the Agriculture, Food, and Environment program. 

    Pricing

    Member: $0  Non-member: $29

  • Greening the Supply Chain Series: Integrating Sustainable Purchasing into University Hospitals of Cleveland's Infrastructure

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 4/9/2014: View this informative webinar to learn how University Hospitals are accelerating environmental purchasing in their supply chain.

    Session Description 

    In this session, University Hospitals' (UH) Supply Chain leadership will describe how they leveraged their Healthier Hospitals Initiative (HHI) engagement to advance sustainable procurement globally, including key successes, challenges, and future opportunities.

    At University Hospitals of Cleveland, their engagement in the procurement-related challenges of the Healthier Hospitals Initiative has led to a collaborative infrastructure between Supply Chain, Sustainability and other key stakeholders from departments with significant purchasing volumes, including:

    • Identifying champions from each UH medical center fro each HHI challenge area, comprising system-wide task forces;
    • Developing regular system Supply Chain & Sustainability leadership review of sustainable purchasing goals; and
    • Negotiating with vendors to establish web-based tracking of procurement parameters (including green cleaners, healthy interiors, and other HHI focus areas).

    This has led to greater integration of functional, economic, social, and environmental considerations in their value analysis processes.

    Join us for an informative webinar to learn how University Hospitals is accelerating enviromental purchasing in their supply chain.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand common challenges facing hospital Supply Chain departments in integrating environmentally preferable purchasing principles in procurement practices.
    • Identify key stakeholders required to achive a systematic approach to sustainable procurement in a typical hospital or health system.
    • Outline examples of how a hospital's engagement in the HHI can accelerate the establishment of a comprehensive sustainable procurement strategy.

    Presenters

    Matthew Pietro, Sustainability Specialist, University Hospitals

    Matthew Pietro serves as the Sustainability Specialist for University Hospitals Health System in Northeast Ohio. He has worked as a Development Associate for the New York Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council. Returning to Cleveland, Matthew served as Interim Education and Outreach Coordinator for Cleveland Clinic's Office for a Healthy Environment. He also co-founded a farm in urban Cleveland called Central Roots, which sells seasonal produce to community members and local restaurants. As UH's Sustainability Specialist, Matthew works with the system's Sustainability Manager, Dr. Aparna Bole, in the project management and execution of sustainability initiatives across the health system.

    Suzanne Hoover, Collaborative Purchasing Manager, University Hospitals, Yellow Belt Lean Six Sigma Certified Materials and Resource Professional

    Suzanne has over 10 years experience in Supply Chain Management with University Hospitals. She has worked as a Purchasing Manager, Contract Administrator and most recently as a Chairperson for a Regional Purchasing Collaborative. She recently joined the EPP efforts on the University Hospitals Sustainability Committee.

    Molly Bammerlin, MBA, Coporate Value Analysis Manager, University Hospitals, Lean Sigma Yellow Belt and ProSci Change Management Certified

    Molly Bammerlin is a supply chain professional with over a decade of experience in the healthcare industry, inclusive of time spent in both the medical sales and hospital purchasing environments. She currently holds the position of Corporate Value Analysis Manager at University Hospitals Health System located in northeast Ohio. Molly is an active participants on UHHS' system-wide Sustainability Council and incorporate sustainable purchasing initiatives and goals into her Value Analysis role. Molly earned her Bachelor of Science in Human and Consumer Sciences from Ohio University and MBA from Lake Erie College, also located in Ohio.

    Pricing

    Member: $0  Non-member: $29

  • HHI Series: Greening the Lawn - An Ecological Designer's Perspective on climate, health and landscaping

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 4/2/2014: This session provides a review of the potential for environmental and human healing with landscape management with a case study from various ecosystem based projects.

    Session Description

    This session provides a review of the potential for environmental and human healing with landscape management with a case study from various ecosystem based projects. Jacob Blue will review some of the most recent research regarding the role nature plays in human health as well as explore opportunities for improving the ecological health and function of landscapes. Following that, we will hear a case study from NorthPointe and their lawn-free campus.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand the impact turf has on greenhouse gases.
    • Learn about studies linking views and landscape with attention, stress and healing.
    • Consider the value of farming on hospital land as a plan for local sourcing, for education and for resiliency.
    • Hear a case study of a hospital that has worked with our presenter to put evidence into a strategic landscape plan. Hear about challenges, successes and lessons learned.

    Presenters

    Jacob Blue, PLA, ASLA, Landscape Architect, Ecosystems Services Project Manager

    Jacob is a registered Landscape Architect in Wisconsin, Missouri, and Pennsylvania. He has been changing how design is done for the last 14 years. A national leader in the emerging fields of Ecosystem Services Management and Ecological Design; he is a classically trained landscape architect and field ecologist. He has coauthored papers and textbooks exploring the nexus of design and ecological science and has participated in and led ecologically-based design projects throughout the United States, India, Peru, and Chile. Using a subtractive rather than an additive design approach, he evaluates the historical and potential ecological communities of a site and then carves out the design program to ensure the maximum ecosystem services can be provided. Jacob holds a Master Degree of Science from University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Bachelors of Landscape Architecture from the he Pennsylvania State University-State College. He is an active member of American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, Vegetation Subcommittee and Technical Core, the Sustainable Site Initiative (SITES).

    Gus Larson, B.A. CNMT, RTR, Director, NorthPointe Health & Wellness Campus

    Gus brought 22 years of healthcare experience to the NorthPointe concept team. Gus focused on what was known & perceived as barriers that prevent patients from accessing healthcare. NorthPointe made the bold decision to restore their land to a Northern Illinois Prairie creating a natural, welcoming environment for healthcare delivery. Six years later NorthPointe has had a positive impact on many lives.

    Concordia University Wisconsin, Mequon, Wisconsin, 2012 B.A. Business Management
    Stateline Leadership Academy Beloit, Wisconsin,1999 Graduation
    CNMT Certification Boards, September 1992 Certification: C.N.M.T.
    Beloit Memorial Hospital School of Radiology Technology, June 1985 Degree: R.T.

    Pricing

    Member: $0   Non-member: $0

  • PGH Sharing Call: Earth Day Sharing Call

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 03/26/2014 - Are you planning on celebrating Earth Day 2014 on April 22?Need some new ideas? Did you do something very successful last year that you’d be willing to share with your colleagues? Are you shy, and would enjoy listening to inspiring ideas from others? Then this call is for you!

    Introduction

    Are you planning on celebrating Earth Day 2014 on April 22?Need some new ideas? Did you do something very successful last year that you’d be willing to share with your colleagues? Are you shy, and would enjoy listening to inspiring ideas from others? Then this call is for you!

    Join other Practice Greenhealth community members in learning about or sharing your current or past plans for fun Earth Day events. Getting the discussion started on the session is Paul A. Linzmeyer, Sustainability Leader at ThedaCare, Barbara Hamilton, Sustainability Manager at Palomar Health, and others.

    Presenters

    Barbara Hamilton, System Sustainability Manager, Palomar Health

    Barbara Hamilton is currently the System Sustainability Manager at Palomar Health in North San Diego County. In this capacity she oversees a comprehensive sustainability program for the health system. Program initiatives include energy and water efficiency, waste reduction & recycling, healthy food, environmentally preferred purchasing, alternative transportation, gardens & sites, and engagement.

    Barbara has served as Chair for the Novation Environmental Advisory Group, a nation-wide advisory working to green the healthcare supply chain. She co-chairs the San Diego Nutrition in Healthcare Leadership Team, working to support Healthy Food in Healthcare initiatives. And she is also an active member of Practice Greenhealth and the Healthier Hospitals Initiative.

    A LEED Green Associate, Barbara has received numerous awards from the Carlsbad Chamber of Commerce during her tenure as Chair of the Sustainability Committee, and also for the success of her sustainability consulting business: Eco-Stream. Her leadership has helped Palomar Health to receive six consecutive Environmental Excellence Awards from Practice Greenhealth, and has herself received an award for Excellence in Sustainability Management in an Acute Care Hospital setting.

    Paul Linzmeyer, Sustainability Leader, Thedacare

    Paul Linzmeyer has the new position of Sustainability Leader for the Wisconsin-based health system, Thedacare, in December 2012. Thedacare created Paul’s position for their focus on energy, waste and water conservation as a system wide initiative for its five hospital health system with 30+ offsites and the largest employer in North East Wisconsin.

    Paul worked on environmental stewardship for over 30 years. He was a US delegate to the Organization Economic Corporation and Development; participated in the UW Nelson Institute's Climate Change Impacts Committee and Chaired the Industry Committee of the Wisconsin Global Warming Task Force in 2007.

    Paul works in Facilities Management, but in his corporate role at Thedacare, is able to work with every department within the system. Thedacare are members of Practice Greenhealth and active participants in HHI.

       Member Only Recourse

  • HHI Series: Investment in Employee Health & Wellness with a Research Update from Vanderbilt Health

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 3/18/2014: Take away tips to link employee wellness to health care spending. Understand one organization's success in linking wellness with environmental stewardship activities.

    Session Description

    Increasingly businesses are discovering the linkage between employee well being, employee engagement and business performance.

    Ironically, hospital workers are sicker than the general population. Health, wellness and the physical environment play a critical role in staff engagement and quality performance. There is a high correlation between patient satisfaction scores and staff engagement, as well as between employee engagement and financial success.

    What drives employee engagement? 1. Worker engagement is improved when the staff perceives that leadership cares about their well-being, and 2. staff engagement relates to the health of the work environment. Staff engagement and the health of the employee is a business issue and if wellness and environmental stewardship programs are not given adequate funding or support, the downstream impact of quality and satisfaction will be impacted.

    Join us for a call with employee engagement expert Eric Parmenter who will share research and evidence around the business value of investing in health and wellness. Eric will discuss the poor health of the hospital workforce, the drivers of employee engagement and the key tenets of successful wellness programs.

    Mary Yarbrough, MD, Associate Professor of Internal Medicine and Preventive Medicine and Executive Director of Faculty/Staff Health and Wellness Program for Vanderbilt University will share a case study from her work at Vanderbilt (which resulted in 25 percent reduced costs associated with staff health care costs) and an overview of employee wellness initiatives through the World Health Organization and CDC’s model for a healthy work place and the emphasis on a healthy environment. This blueprint provides a foundation for the business case for healthier environments. Dr. Yarbrough will also share tips on evaluation and innovation in developing partnerships and the relationship between wellness and environmental stewardship at Vanderbilt.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand the business case and return on investment for engaging the health care worker.
    • Recognize the link between an engaged worker and a reduction in health care costs.
    • Take away tips to link employee wellness to health care spending.
    • Understand one organization’s success in linking wellness with environmental stewardship activities.

    Presenters

    Eric Parmenter, Vice President Employer Services at Evolent Health

    Eric Parmenter, CLU, ChFC, LUTCF, RHU, REBC, SPHR, CEBS, MBA is Vice President of Employer Services for Evolent Health. He is a former Vice President of Consultant at HighRoads and Senior Consultant and Principal with Towers Watson. He has worked in the employee benefits business for over 25 years, serving as an adviser to his hospital and health system clients, developing innovative total rewards strategies that align with client needs, objectives and strategies.
    Eric is a recognized national leader in the hospital health system industry and a recognized expert on the impact of Health Care Reform on health care providers. He is a consultant with deep experience in health plan strategy, design, wellness and productivity.

    Dr. Mary Yarbrough, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Internal Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Executive Director of Faculty/Staff Health and Wellness Programs, Vanderbilt

    Dr. Yarbrough earned an M.D. from Vanderbilt and an MPH from Johns Hopkins. She completed residencies at Vanderbilt (Internal Medicine) and Johns Hopkins (Preventive Medicine and Public Health) and is boarded in Internal Medicine, General Preventive Medicine and Public Health, and Occupational Medicine. She is an Associate Professor of Internal Medicine and Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt. She is the Executive Director of Vanderbilt’s Faculty/Staff Health and Wellness Programs, which includes the Occupational Health Clinic; the Child and Family Centers; Work/Life Connections--EAP, including the Faculty/Physician Wellness and Nurse Wellness Programs; and Health Plus, Vanderbilt’s health promotion program. Previously she served as a Luce Scholar in Sabah Malaysia, as a consultant to the World Health Organization, and as Director of Environmental Epidemiology for the Tennessee Department of Health.

    Pricing

    Member: $0   Non-member: $0

  • Greening the Supply Chain Series: Upstream and Downstream it All Comes out in the Wash: Greening Laundry Chemicals

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 3/13/2014: Attendees will come away with a much clearer understanding of the effectiveness of sustainable laundry care products and the importance of their use in protecting people and the planet.

    Session Description

    Mark Petruzzi, Sr. VP of Outreach & Strategic Relations at Green Seal will discuss the environmental and health impacts of laundry chemicals and how the new Green Seal standard (GS-51) addresses those impacts. He will give a brief overview of Green Seal's stakeholder-based standard-development process and the requirements for certification, including audits of laundry facilities. He will inform attendees about the life cycle considerations of laundry chemicals, including the importance of efficacy. And he will track the increase in specification and use of green cleaning products seen among institutions during Green Seal's 24 years in the industry. This includes recent references to GS-51 by Practice Greenhealth and the state of Massachusetts. Attendees will come away with a much clearer understanding of the effectiveness of sustainable laundry care products and the importance of their use in protecting people and the planet.

    Learning Objectives

    • Realize how laundry chemicals impact human health and the environment.
    • Learn how Green Seal defines green laundry chemicals under their GS-51 standard.
    • Understand how chemical manufacturers can offer greener laundry products.
    • Recognize the market leadership opportunities in using a green laundry service.

    Presenter

    Mark Petruzzi, Sr. VP of Outreach & Strategic Relations, Green Seal

    Mark leads Green Seal's engagement with purchasers, industry groups, trade associations and other external organizations that share Green Seal's goal of a more sustainable marketplace. Over the last 18 years, he has conducted research on the life cycle impacts of products and services, developed criteria to address key impacts, and evaluated products and services for compliance with Green Seal's standards in a wide range of product and service categories. Previously he directed Green Seal's Certification Program. He holds a B.S. in mechanical engineering and a M.S. in civil and environmental engineering from The George Washington University.

    Pricing

    Member: $0  Non-member: $29

  • Greening the OR Series: Single Use Device Reprocessing - Going Green Saves Green

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 3/4/2014: ​Understand how single-use device reprocessing has become an essential component to hospitals sustainability programs as they attempt to do more with less.

    Session Description 

    Understand how single-use device reprocessing has become an essential component to hospitals sustainability programs as they attempt to do more with less. Learning Objectives: Discuss the regulatory aspects of reprocessing.Compare FDA requirements for reprocessors to those for Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). List the essential components for implementing a safe and effective reprocessing program. Describe organizational benefits of reprocessing including reducing costs and waste.

    Learning Objectives

    • Discuss the regulatory aspects of reprocessing.
    • Compare FDA requirements for reprocessors to those for Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs).
    • List the essential components for implementing a safe and effective reprocessing program.
    • Describe organizational benefits of reprocessing including reducing costs and waste.

    Presenter

    Daniel J. Vukelich, Esq., CAE, President and CEO, Association of Medical Device Reprocessors (AMDR)

    Daniel J. Vukelich, Esq. is the President/CEO of the Association of Medical Device Reprocessors (AMDR). Mr. Vukelich has been with AMDR since 2000, having previously served as the Association’s Deputy Executive Director. AMDR represents approximately 95 percent of the third-party medical device reprocessing done in the U.S. today. Mr. Vukelich joined AMDR in the same year the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued requirements putting reprocessors on equal regulatory footing with medical device manufacturers. During his time at AMDR, he has worked with regulators and legislators as they implemented the federal Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act of 2002 (MDUFMA), the Medical Devices Technical Corrections Act of 2004 (MDTCA), the Medical Device User Fee Stabilization Act of 2005 (MDUFSA), the FDA Amendments of 2007, and the comprehensive healthcare insurance reform legislation of 2009-2010.

    Mr. Vukelich has overseen a team of state contract lobbyists and has beaten back every legislative attempt brought by some in the original equipment manufacturing industry aimed at reprocessing to date. Mr. Vukelich also has represents the device reprocessing industry before state regulatory agencies and international bodies (including Canada, the European Union, and other nations).
    In 2000, the nation’s third-party reprocessing industry saved U.S. hospitals $20 million in device acquisition costs. Today, AMDR’s members save U.S. hospitals over $300 million a year in device acquisition and disposal costs. AMDR’s members now also serve all of the nation’s “Honor Roll” hospitals, as listed by U.S. News & World Report and all of the top 10 “heart hospitals.”

    With 13 years experience working on medical device reprocessing issues, Mr. Vukelich is intimately familiar with the legal, regulatory, public relations and political issues surrounding the reprocessing industry. Prior to joining AMDR, Mr. Vukelich gained experience working for a non-profit citizens’ advocacy group and worked on a U.S. Senate campaign. He is a member of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI), the American Society of Association Executives, the American League of Lobbyists, among other groups, and is a Certified Association Executive (CAE) through ASAE and a former National Debate champion (1996). Mr. Vukelich received a B.A. in Political Science and Public Communication with Pi Sigma Alpha honors from the American University in Washington, DC and his Juris Doctor degree from the American University’s Washington College of Law. He is a native of Minneapolis and a member of the Florida and District of Columbia Bars.

    Pricing

    Member: $0  Non-member: $29

  • HHI Series: The Climate Connection -- Yesterday's Garbage Results in 9% of the US Carbon Footprint - Food Waste Best Management Practices

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 2/27/14: Hear from the State of Vermont, as a leader in food waste composting, with a case study by Fletcher Allen on their food waste composting. Join us to take the next step in climate action by diverting food waste from landfills and nourishing soil.

    Session Description

    According to Practice Greenhealth’s Sustainability Benchmark Report, hospitals generate over 30 pounds of waste per bed per day. Once we remove material for donation or recycling, thousands of trucks transport this material for burn or bury. Half of landfill material is made up of food, paper and other compostable material. This material produces Methane, a greenhouse gas, 72 times more potent that carbon dioxide over a 20 year period. The US EPA identifies landfills as contributing 9% of the US carbon emissions through the development of methane. States are starting to take notice and ban food waste from landfills to both reduce methane generation, increase space in crowded landfills and to nourish land for farming and soil amendment.

    Join us to hear from the state of Vermont, as a leader in food waste composting with a case study by Fletcher Allen on their food waste composting. Join us to take the next step in climate action by diverting food waste from landfills and nourishing soil.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand food wastes role in methane gas production and role in climate change.
    • Take away guidance for assessing and implementing a food waste management program.
    • Learn how one hospital has taken steps to prevent and compost food waste material.
    • Understand what the challenges are in composting in a health care facility and some tips for success.

    Presenters

    Josh Kelly, Environmental Analyst IV, Solid Waste Management Program, VT Dept. of Environmental Conservation

    Josh Kelly joined the Agency of Natural Resources, Solid Waste Program in July 2013. Previously, while at the at the Institute for Sustainable Communities, Josh has developed sustainability training and networking workshops for local government officials from across the country. He was also formerly the “Close the Loop” Project Manager at the Highfields Center for Composting, where he worked with solid waste districts, state agencies, haulers, composters, schools and businesses to develop community composting programs around Vermont. For the prior 7 years Josh worked for the Trust for Public Land on a variety of land conservation projects throughout Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. Josh has a BS in Environmental Studies and Biology from St. Lawrence University.

    Barbara Hartman, MS, RD, LD, Chief of Nutrition and Food Service, Martinsburg VA Medical Center

    Barbara Hartman, MS, RD, LD, is the Chief of Nutrition and Food Service at the Martinsburg VA Medical Center in West Virginia where she and her staff have redesigned their business practices to include a “Green Kitchen” focus. They have successfully implemented a “Waste Watchers” project that has improved compliance with the EPA’s Food Waste Management hierarchy by implementing source reduction, composting, and food donation programs. They have also worked toward improving the conservation of energy and water, and have increased their service of sustainable foods and beverages.

    In April 2010, the Waste Watchers program won the VA Sustainability Award in the waste management category. In October 2010, they won the GreenGov Presidential Award, Good Neighbor category for their Waste Watchers and local food procurement practices. Barbara is presently a Co-Chair of the VA’s national Nutrition and Food Service Green Environmental Management Working Group and a past chair of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) Hunger and Environmental Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group (HEN DPG). She served on the 2007 AND Sustainable Food Systems task force and helped author the 2007 AND Sustainable Food Systems Primer. In 2013, Barbara participated in a HEN DPG work group to originate standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists in sustainable, resilient and healthy food and water systems. She received the Hunger and Environmental Nutrition Leadership Award in October, 2008. Her master’s degree is in Food, Nutrition, and Institution Administration, and her bachelor’s degree is in Business with a concentration in Marketing.

    Daria Holcomb, Manager Dining Services, Nutrition Services, Fletcher Allen Health Care

    Daria Holcomb is a graduate from the University of Massachusetts with a degree in Business Administration. She has over 35 years’experience managing a variety of food service operations. Her experiences range from casual and fine dining, special event catering and most recently retail in health care. For the past ten years she has been the Manager of Dining Services at Fletcher Allen Health Care responsible for the five retail areas. Her accomplishments include implementing an electronic payment system and creating three new retail operations that are models for the Fletcher Allen Health Care’s commitment to serving healthy, local and sustainable food.

    Pricing

    Member: $0  Non-member: $0

  • Sustainable Operations Series: Reducing the Carbon Footprint of Health Care Products

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 2/20/2014: o meet this demand, internationally recognized tools and methods are required by the sector to facilitate cost effective management of GHG emissions.

    Session Description

    Purchasing plays a critical role in sustainable health care and contributes a significant amount to the carbon footprint of the sector. In a recent report, the NHS Sustainable Development Unit (SDU) calculated that 61% of the carbon footprint was related to procurement. Of the total NHS England GHG emissions over 21% were attributable to pharmaceuticals and 11% to medical devices. With increasing population and the growth of the healthcare sector, business as usual is not an option: the management and reduction of GHG emissions is essential in the face of global climate change targets. The sector requires a strategy to prioritize the biggest contributors to its aggregate emissions, and which embeds GHG emission reductions in product development. To meet this demand, internationally recognized tools and methods are required by the sector to facilitate cost effective management of GHG emissions.

    This session will also highlight how to measure a product’s environmental footprint through the example of the first medical product certified by the
    Carbon Trust. Carbon footprinting allows manufacturers to seek continuous improvement and transparency of product performance, help hospitals reach greenhouse gas reduction goals, and complements the environmental attributes captured by the Practice Greenhealth Standardized Questions for Medical Products. This medical product (ALBUMIN) has a 28% lower carbon footprint than the comparable product in a glass container for the entire product life cycle, including production of raw materials, product manufacturing, transportation, and end-of-life.

    Learning Objectives

    • Identify the likely hotspots of GHG impact in healthcare and product life cycles.
    • Understand how a carbon footprint relates to other product environmental attributes, such as waste reduction.
    • Demonstrate how the potential environmental impact of a product, from raw material extraction to end-of-life, is quantified.
    • Introduce the guidance and tools available to support GHG reduction strategies.

    Presenters

    Tom Penny, Senior Consultant, Environmental Resources Management (ERM)


    Tom Penny is a Senior Consultant in ERM's Product Sustainability Services practice. Tom is an expert in life cycle assessment and supply chain GHG management and was a primary author of the GHG Protocol Product Life Cycle Accounting and Reporting Standard: Sector Guidance for Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Products. He has worked on a range of sustainability issues with pharmaceutical companies and private and public healthcare providers. He continues to work with the UK NHS Sustainable Development Unit to support the reduction of the UK public health service carbon footprint. More broadly, Tom has applied his expertise in in the healthcare, electronics, manufacturing, packaging, mining, oil & gas, retail and telecommunications sectors. He is a member of the American ACLCA and Australian ALCAS professional societies.

    Margaret Enos, Manager, Product Stewardship, Baxter Healthcare Corporation


    Margaret Enos is Manager of Product Stewardship for global Environment, Health & Safety at Baxter. She helps Baxter manage and improve the sustainability performance of new products in development and existing products, and conducts life cycle assessment projects to quantify the environmental footprint of products and therapies. Prior to joining Baxter in 2012, Margaret helped companies manage sustainability performance at the product and enterprise level through life cycle assessment studies and tools and implementation of sustainability information systems as a sustainability consultant at PE INTERNATIONAL. She holds a Master of Environmental Science and Management from UC Santa Barbara.

    Adam Baum, Senior Marketing Manager, Baxter Healthcare Corporation


    Adam Baum is a Senior Marketing Manager with twelve years of diverse experience in healthcare marketing, strategy and new product development. He has spent five years at Baxter within the renal and biotherapeutics divisions and currently leads global albumin initiatives. Prior to Baxter he developed and managed long term care facilities in Illinois. Adam holds an MBA from Northwestern’s Kellogg School of management.

    Pricing

    Member: $0   Non-member: $29

  • Leadership/Advocacy Series: Everyone is A Leader - Empowering Your Green Team With Distributed Leadership

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 1/22/2014: In this workshop we'll share how we've embraced this model of distributed leadership in our Green Team and experienced improved engagement.

    Session Description

    Green Teams are often viewed as teams that are led by one individual, while the rest of the team follows. In reality, each Green Team member is a leader in his/her own right. At Virginia Mason, each Green Team member is viewed as a leader and empowered to make changes in the organization that improve our environmental impact. In this workshop we'll share how we've embraced this model of distributed leadership in our Green Team and experienced improved engagement. We'll also talk about our "idea system", based on Toyota Production System idea systems,and how we've used it to empower the Green Team and other employees to implement green ideas. When you look at every employee as an environmental leader, you open the window to new opportunities in your organization. Come learn how we have done this with success, and how you can implement it in your organization.

    Learning Objectives

    • Compare traditional leadership models with distributed leadership models.
    • Learn how to implement distributed leadership in your green team.
    • Learn how to use a "lean" idea system to identify, test, and implement green ideas.
    • Learn how to engage your green team by leveraging their innate gifts and talents.

    Presenter

    Brenna Davis, Director of Sustainability, Virginia Mason Medical Center.
    Ms. Davis has been committed to the environmental movement for over thirty years. She started her sustainability work in 1995, where she worked for the petroleum industry on pollution prevention and industrial recycling projects. For fifteen years prior to joining Virginia Mason, she worked in the energy sector with local, national, and international corporations to develop cutting edge environmental sustainability programs. She approaches sustainability work with a focus on creating a safe space for employees to express their inherent gifts and talents through environmental leadership. Ms. Davis holds a Bachelor's Degree in Environmental Science from Huxley College of the Environment at Western Washington University and a Master's Degree in Management from Antioch University. She is a graduate of the UW Foster School of Business Executive Development Program, and is a World Affairs Council Fellow. She serves as a founding member of the Huxley College of the Environment Advisory Board. On a personal note, Ms. Davis collects classic vinyl albums with a preference for anything recorded by the Clash. She is currently writing a book exploring the link between compassion and reduced environmental impact.

    Pricing

    Member: $0   Non-member: $29