Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • HHI Series: The Climate Connection -- Yesterday's Garbage Results in 9% of the US Carbon Footprint - Food Waste Best Management Practices

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 2/27/14: Hear from the State of Vermont, as a leader in food waste composting, with a case study by Fletcher Allen on their food waste composting. Join us to take the next step in climate action by diverting food waste from landfills and nourishing soil.

    Session Description

    According to Practice Greenhealth’s Sustainability Benchmark Report, hospitals generate over 30 pounds of waste per bed per day. Once we remove material for donation or recycling, thousands of trucks transport this material for burn or bury. Half of landfill material is made up of food, paper and other compostable material. This material produces Methane, a greenhouse gas, 72 times more potent that carbon dioxide over a 20 year period. The US EPA identifies landfills as contributing 9% of the US carbon emissions through the development of methane. States are starting to take notice and ban food waste from landfills to both reduce methane generation, increase space in crowded landfills and to nourish land for farming and soil amendment.

    Join us to hear from the state of Vermont, as a leader in food waste composting with a case study by Fletcher Allen on their food waste composting. Join us to take the next step in climate action by diverting food waste from landfills and nourishing soil.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand food wastes role in methane gas production and role in climate change.
    • Take away guidance for assessing and implementing a food waste management program.
    • Learn how one hospital has taken steps to prevent and compost food waste material.
    • Understand what the challenges are in composting in a health care facility and some tips for success.

    Presenters

    Josh Kelly, Environmental Analyst IV, Solid Waste Management Program, VT Dept. of Environmental Conservation

    Josh Kelly joined the Agency of Natural Resources, Solid Waste Program in July 2013. Previously, while at the at the Institute for Sustainable Communities, Josh has developed sustainability training and networking workshops for local government officials from across the country. He was also formerly the “Close the Loop” Project Manager at the Highfields Center for Composting, where he worked with solid waste districts, state agencies, haulers, composters, schools and businesses to develop community composting programs around Vermont. For the prior 7 years Josh worked for the Trust for Public Land on a variety of land conservation projects throughout Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. Josh has a BS in Environmental Studies and Biology from St. Lawrence University.

    Barbara Hartman, MS, RD, LD, Chief of Nutrition and Food Service, Martinsburg VA Medical Center

    Barbara Hartman, MS, RD, LD, is the Chief of Nutrition and Food Service at the Martinsburg VA Medical Center in West Virginia where she and her staff have redesigned their business practices to include a “Green Kitchen” focus. They have successfully implemented a “Waste Watchers” project that has improved compliance with the EPA’s Food Waste Management hierarchy by implementing source reduction, composting, and food donation programs. They have also worked toward improving the conservation of energy and water, and have increased their service of sustainable foods and beverages.

    In April 2010, the Waste Watchers program won the VA Sustainability Award in the waste management category. In October 2010, they won the GreenGov Presidential Award, Good Neighbor category for their Waste Watchers and local food procurement practices. Barbara is presently a Co-Chair of the VA’s national Nutrition and Food Service Green Environmental Management Working Group and a past chair of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) Hunger and Environmental Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group (HEN DPG). She served on the 2007 AND Sustainable Food Systems task force and helped author the 2007 AND Sustainable Food Systems Primer. In 2013, Barbara participated in a HEN DPG work group to originate standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists in sustainable, resilient and healthy food and water systems. She received the Hunger and Environmental Nutrition Leadership Award in October, 2008. Her master’s degree is in Food, Nutrition, and Institution Administration, and her bachelor’s degree is in Business with a concentration in Marketing.

    Daria Holcomb, Manager Dining Services, Nutrition Services, Fletcher Allen Health Care

    Daria Holcomb is a graduate from the University of Massachusetts with a degree in Business Administration. She has over 35 years’experience managing a variety of food service operations. Her experiences range from casual and fine dining, special event catering and most recently retail in health care. For the past ten years she has been the Manager of Dining Services at Fletcher Allen Health Care responsible for the five retail areas. Her accomplishments include implementing an electronic payment system and creating three new retail operations that are models for the Fletcher Allen Health Care’s commitment to serving healthy, local and sustainable food.

    Pricing

    Member: $0  Non-member: $0

  • Sustainable Operations Series: Reducing the Carbon Footprint of Health Care Products

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 2/20/2014: o meet this demand, internationally recognized tools and methods are required by the sector to facilitate cost effective management of GHG emissions.

    Session Description

    Purchasing plays a critical role in sustainable health care and contributes a significant amount to the carbon footprint of the sector. In a recent report, the NHS Sustainable Development Unit (SDU) calculated that 61% of the carbon footprint was related to procurement. Of the total NHS England GHG emissions over 21% were attributable to pharmaceuticals and 11% to medical devices. With increasing population and the growth of the healthcare sector, business as usual is not an option: the management and reduction of GHG emissions is essential in the face of global climate change targets. The sector requires a strategy to prioritize the biggest contributors to its aggregate emissions, and which embeds GHG emission reductions in product development. To meet this demand, internationally recognized tools and methods are required by the sector to facilitate cost effective management of GHG emissions.

    This session will also highlight how to measure a product’s environmental footprint through the example of the first medical product certified by the
    Carbon Trust. Carbon footprinting allows manufacturers to seek continuous improvement and transparency of product performance, help hospitals reach greenhouse gas reduction goals, and complements the environmental attributes captured by the Practice Greenhealth Standardized Questions for Medical Products. This medical product (ALBUMIN) has a 28% lower carbon footprint than the comparable product in a glass container for the entire product life cycle, including production of raw materials, product manufacturing, transportation, and end-of-life.

    Learning Objectives

    • Identify the likely hotspots of GHG impact in healthcare and product life cycles.
    • Understand how a carbon footprint relates to other product environmental attributes, such as waste reduction.
    • Demonstrate how the potential environmental impact of a product, from raw material extraction to end-of-life, is quantified.
    • Introduce the guidance and tools available to support GHG reduction strategies.

    Presenters

    Tom Penny, Senior Consultant, Environmental Resources Management (ERM)


    Tom Penny is a Senior Consultant in ERM's Product Sustainability Services practice. Tom is an expert in life cycle assessment and supply chain GHG management and was a primary author of the GHG Protocol Product Life Cycle Accounting and Reporting Standard: Sector Guidance for Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Products. He has worked on a range of sustainability issues with pharmaceutical companies and private and public healthcare providers. He continues to work with the UK NHS Sustainable Development Unit to support the reduction of the UK public health service carbon footprint. More broadly, Tom has applied his expertise in in the healthcare, electronics, manufacturing, packaging, mining, oil & gas, retail and telecommunications sectors. He is a member of the American ACLCA and Australian ALCAS professional societies.

    Margaret Enos, Manager, Product Stewardship, Baxter Healthcare Corporation


    Margaret Enos is Manager of Product Stewardship for global Environment, Health & Safety at Baxter. She helps Baxter manage and improve the sustainability performance of new products in development and existing products, and conducts life cycle assessment projects to quantify the environmental footprint of products and therapies. Prior to joining Baxter in 2012, Margaret helped companies manage sustainability performance at the product and enterprise level through life cycle assessment studies and tools and implementation of sustainability information systems as a sustainability consultant at PE INTERNATIONAL. She holds a Master of Environmental Science and Management from UC Santa Barbara.

    Adam Baum, Senior Marketing Manager, Baxter Healthcare Corporation


    Adam Baum is a Senior Marketing Manager with twelve years of diverse experience in healthcare marketing, strategy and new product development. He has spent five years at Baxter within the renal and biotherapeutics divisions and currently leads global albumin initiatives. Prior to Baxter he developed and managed long term care facilities in Illinois. Adam holds an MBA from Northwestern’s Kellogg School of management.

    Pricing

    Member: $0   Non-member: $29

  • Leadership/Advocacy Series: Everyone is A Leader - Empowering Your Green Team With Distributed Leadership

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 1/22/2014: In this workshop we'll share how we've embraced this model of distributed leadership in our Green Team and experienced improved engagement.

    Session Description

    Green Teams are often viewed as teams that are led by one individual, while the rest of the team follows. In reality, each Green Team member is a leader in his/her own right. At Virginia Mason, each Green Team member is viewed as a leader and empowered to make changes in the organization that improve our environmental impact. In this workshop we'll share how we've embraced this model of distributed leadership in our Green Team and experienced improved engagement. We'll also talk about our "idea system", based on Toyota Production System idea systems,and how we've used it to empower the Green Team and other employees to implement green ideas. When you look at every employee as an environmental leader, you open the window to new opportunities in your organization. Come learn how we have done this with success, and how you can implement it in your organization.

    Learning Objectives

    • Compare traditional leadership models with distributed leadership models.
    • Learn how to implement distributed leadership in your green team.
    • Learn how to use a "lean" idea system to identify, test, and implement green ideas.
    • Learn how to engage your green team by leveraging their innate gifts and talents.

    Presenter

    Brenna Davis, Director of Sustainability, Virginia Mason Medical Center.
    Ms. Davis has been committed to the environmental movement for over thirty years. She started her sustainability work in 1995, where she worked for the petroleum industry on pollution prevention and industrial recycling projects. For fifteen years prior to joining Virginia Mason, she worked in the energy sector with local, national, and international corporations to develop cutting edge environmental sustainability programs. She approaches sustainability work with a focus on creating a safe space for employees to express their inherent gifts and talents through environmental leadership. Ms. Davis holds a Bachelor's Degree in Environmental Science from Huxley College of the Environment at Western Washington University and a Master's Degree in Management from Antioch University. She is a graduate of the UW Foster School of Business Executive Development Program, and is a World Affairs Council Fellow. She serves as a founding member of the Huxley College of the Environment Advisory Board. On a personal note, Ms. Davis collects classic vinyl albums with a preference for anything recorded by the Clash. She is currently writing a book exploring the link between compassion and reduced environmental impact.

    Pricing

    Member: $0   Non-member: $29

  • Climate/Energy Series: Disclose, Assess, Improve: Sustainability Reporting Best Practice

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 1/15/2014:This discussion will look at the best techniques for engaging stakeholders, identifying reporting needs, managing data and disclosure across a large organization and its supply chain.

    Session Description

    Each year, large organizations are required to file a library's worth of sustainability reports that request different data, in different formats, for different purposes. Increasingly, they're forcing this burden upon their supply chains as well. With investors, regulators and consumers demanding greater transparency and accountability, the stakes have never been higher.

    This discussion will look at the best techniques for engaging stakeholders, identifying reporting needs, managing data and disclosure across a large organization and its supply chain. A panel including a sustainability reporter, a sustainability protocol official, and the CEO of a sustainability software provider will share techniques for collecting and reporting qualitative and quantitative data, discuss how to derive maximum value from the data disclosed and how to take action to correct deficiencies and capture opportunities.

    Measurabl is building new technology for sustainability reporting and is now exploring how to apply its innovate software to ease the sustainability reporting burden in the healthcare sector (Practice Greenhealth, Global Reporting Initiative, Carbon Disclosure Project). Join for a panel discussion with Matt Ellis, CEO of Measurabl, Cleveland Clinic’s Jon Utech and the Global Reporting Initiative’s Mike Wallace for a discussion around data collection, management and sustainability reporting.

    Learning Objectives

    • Learn how to collect and report qualitative and quantitative data for reporting purposes.
    • See examples of peer benchmarking and opportunity analysis.
    • Learn how to take action to correct deficiencies or seize opportunities.

    Presenters

    Matt Ellis, Founder & CEO, Measurabl

    Matt is CEO of Measurabl, a sustainability reporting software company. Before founding Measurabl, Matt was Director of Sustainability Solutions at CBRE, the world's largest commercial real estate services company, where he was responsible for implementing sustainability programs on behalf of Fortune 500 companies and commercial real estate owners and managers.

    Jon E. Utech, Senior Director of the Office for a Healthy Environment, Cleveland Clinic

    John Utech is the Senior Director of the Office for a Healthy Environment at Cleveland Clinic, where he develops sustainability strategies to emphasize the triple bottom line. Jon earned his MBA and MS-OD from Case Western Reserve, has more than 18 years of corporate strategy and planning experience and 8 years of experience implementing corporate sustainability programs. As the Co-Founder and CFO of Carbon Vision, Jon financed and built 120 residential and commercial solar systems and worked on energy efficiency projects with universities, municipalities and non-profits.

    Mike Wallace, Director, GRI

    Mike Wallace is an internationally recognized expert in the sustainability field. Since 2009, he has served as a Director for the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) and since 2010 as the Director of GRI's Focal Point US & Canada. Officially launched in January 2011 at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), GRI’s Focal Point USA & Canada is responsible for supporting the growth and quality of sustainability reporting. Since opening GRI in North America, documented GRI sustainability reporting has more than doubled in North America and is occurring across all areas of the economy; public and private companies; federal, state & local governments; nonprofits and academic institutions. 

    Pricing 

    Member: $0  Non-member: $29

  • HHI Series: Engaged Leadership - Shaping Health Care Future with the HHI

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 12/20/2013: Join Gary and Seema and be part of the transformation that is sweeping the world.

    Session Description

    “We can’t have healthy people on a sick planet.” - Gary Cohen

    A conversation with Gary Cohen, Founder and President of Health Care without Harm and Seema Wadhwa, Director, Healthier Hospitals Initiative

    Pioneering environmental health, Gary is President and Founder of Health Care without Harm and the vision behind the Healthier Hospitals Initiative. Gary will lead a discussion, using research and studies to make connections between human and environmental health. Gary’s inspirational message can help mobilize leaders to see environmental stewardship as an opportunity for cost savings, mission demonstration, community benefit and healthier communities. Join Gary and Seema and be part of the transformation that is sweeping the world.

                                                          

    Prior to founding Health Care without Harm, Cohen was Executive Director of the Environmental Health Fund for many years. He has helped built coalitions and networks globally to address the environmental health impacts related to toxic chemical exposure and climate change.

    Learn more and engage in the growing movement for sustainable health care and join others in the linking of environmental innovation with cost savings and healthier communities.

    Learning Objectives

    • Cite three connections between planetary and human health.
    • Identify the six challenge of the Healthier Hospitals Initiative
    • Name three specific activities that a hospital can take to contribute to healthier environments and cost saving

    Presenter

    Gary Cohen, Co-Founder and President, Health Care Without Harm and Practice Greenhealth

    Mr. Cohen is Co-Founder and President of Health Care Without Harm and Practice Greenhealth. He is a member of the International Advisory Board of the Sambhavna Clinic in Bhopal, India, established to help heal people affected by the Bhopal gas tragedy. He is on the board of the American Sustainable Business Council and Health Leads. Cohen has received the Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship. In 2011, he received an Environmental Merit Award from the EPA in recognition of exceptional work and commitment to the environment.

    Seema Wadhwa, LEED AP, Director, Healthier Hospitals Initiative

    Seema Wadhwa is the Director, Program Management for the Healthier Hospitals Initiative. She also is the Director of Sustainability at Urban Ltd. and serves as the Director of
    Sustainability for Inova Health System, an HHI sponsor comprised of hospitals, nursing homes, emergency- and urgent-care centers, assisted-living communities and community health and wellness programs.

    Seema is responsible for the creation and adoption of sustainable management practices at Inova Health System. Prior to her role with Inova Health System, Seema spent several years managing engineering design projects. Seema’s industry experience extends to advising about best practices in green building and enabling a sustainable approach to the design and implementation of health care projects. She is a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) accredited professional. 

    Pricing

    Member: $0   Non-member: $0

  • Green Build Series: Inspiring High Performance Healing Environments - A Panel Discussion: US Green Building Council, Seton Healthcare Family

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 12/12/2013: The dynamic format of this session will include direct project experience and feedback on the use of the LEED for Healthcare rating system since its launch at CleanMed in 2011.

    Session Description

    This webinar has been approved by AIA for 1.0 CE Credits.The healthcare industry has come a long way in defining the goals of sustainability that can be embraced to improve the effectiveness and performance of the healthcare delivery system. The dynamic format of this session will include direct project experience and feedback on the use of the LEED for Healthcare rating system since its launch at CleanMed in 2011. It will also feature planned improvements to the rating system in the next version of LEED. The credits in the rating system are tailored to the needs of the Healthcare industry and reflect state of the art healthcare design and construction. Many projects are now pursuing certification under this rating system and this session will feature the project furthest along in review under LEED for Healthcare, an addition to the Dell Children's hospital in Austin, TX. Speakers will cover the content of the rating system, and the strategies needed to meet these requirements.Learning Objectives: Understand the implementation of LEED for Healthcare.Understand the differences between LEED for New Construction prerequisites and credits and LEED for Healthcare prerequisites and credits.Learn how design paradigms will need to change to embrace the concepts inherent in the next version of LEED for Healthcare due out in 2013.Obtain tools and ideas for implementing the concepts to create more sustainable healthcare spaces.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand the implementation of LEED for Healthcare.
    • Understand the differences between LEED for New Construction prerequisites and credits and LEED for Healthcare prerequisites and credits.
    • Learn how design paradigms will need to change to embrace the concepts inherent in the next version of LEED for Healthcare due out in 2013.
    • Obtain tools and ideas for implementing the concepts to create more sustainable healthcare spaces.

    Presenters

    Melissa Gallagher-Rogers, LEED® AP, Director of LEED Technical Solutio, U.S. Green Building Council

    Melissa Gallagher-Rogers is Co-Director, Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems. She is Founding Chair of LEED for Healthcare Committee, co-author of Sustainable Healthcare Architecture and was featured as an Innovator: Building a Greener World in TIME. She is responsible for the development of technical solutions related to the LEED green building rating system and is primary liaison to sectors such as government, hospitality and healthcare to ensure that their needs are met as they green their building portfolios by implementing the LEED.

    Michele L. Van Hyfte, AIA LEED AP BD+C, Manager Environmental Stewardship, Seton Network Facilities

    Michele L. Van Hyfte, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, a Registered Architect and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Accredited Professional, develops and leads environmental stewardship and sustainability programs for Seton Healthcare Family.
    As Seton’s Manager of Environmental Stewardship, Michele serves as Co-Chairperson of the Seton Network Green Team, develops green teams at each of Seton’s hospitals, manages compliance with environmental regulations and coordinates initiatives, standards and outreach.

    Michele joined Seton in 2012 year after eight years with Monarch Design/Consulting, an architectural design and consulting firm she founded that specialized in high-performance buildings. She has over 18 years of experience in design and construction and earned a Masters of Architecture from Virginia Tech and a Bachelors of Science in Architecture from the University of Illinois.
    She serves on the Board of Directors for the Downtown Austin Alliance and Envision Central Texas. She is a member of the USGBC Central Texas- Balcones Chapter, a former Chapter Vice Chair, founding member, and Advisory Council member. She is a member of the American Institute of Architects Austin Chapter, a former Chairperson of its Committee on the Environment, a former chapter Executive Committee member, and past recipient of its Young Architectural Professional of the Year.

    Sponsor

    Pricing

    Member: $0  Non-member: $29  Construction Specialties Guest: $0

  • Sharing Call: Patient /Family Housing Energy and Water Upgrade with City and Utility Funds

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 12/11/2013

    Recorded on 12/11/2013 - Join Brenna Davis, Director of Sustainability at Virginia Mason for a discussion on Patient /Family Housing Energy and Water Upgrade.

    Description

    Join Brenna Davis, Director of Sustainability at Virginia Mason for a discussion on Patient /Family Housing Energy and Water Upgrade.

    Pricing

    Member: $0 Non-member: $0


  • HHI Series: Less Waste - Red Bag Waste Reduction

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded 11/18/2013: Discuss strategies for successful implementation of recycling and regulated medical waste minimization programs.Highlight Johns Hopkins Health System case study, cost savings, successes and lessons learned.

    Session Description

    Everyone knows healthcare can be a messy business – with hospitals generating approximately 5.9 million tons of waste every year destined for landfills, incineration, or other environmentally harmful treatment options. What might not be so obvious is that the various waste streams within a healthcare can be very costly – with the average hospital spending lots of money on waste disposal each year. As hospitals look to identify cost-savings, one are for constant education is around regulated medical waste. Many hospitals currently throw much of their waste in the regulated medical waste (RMW) stream, despite being non-infectious. RMW is much more expensive – and harsher on the environment. Hospitals that have implemented an education, minimization and segregation program have seen significant cost savings and a reduction in overall waste.

    Learn how Johns Hopkins Health System has used the HHI as a scorecard to establish measurable goals for sustainability improvements, and through a focused effort to reduce its regulated medical waste stream, was able to reduce RMW by over 50%, in the first six months!

    Learning Objectives

    • Describe the different waste streams and types in healthcare organizations
    • Delineate opportunities to reduce waste and engage multiple stakeholders across the organization
    • Discuss strategies for successful implementation of recycling and regulated medical waste minimization programs
    • Highlight Johns Hopkins Health System case study, cost savings, successes and lessons learned

    Presenter

    Kristian Hayes, MPH, Assistant Director, General Services, Johns Hopkins Medicine

    Kristian Hayes is Assistant Director of General Services at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She is currently responsible for creating a health system sustainability program and education and training program for the Department of General Services. Mrs. Hayes developed a system-wide Sustainability strategy that resulted in Johns Hopkins reaching Healthier Hospital Initiatives Less Waste and Engaged Leadership national targets. During her time, she doubled recycling from 7% to 16% and reduced RMW by over 50%. Within the first 2 months of her new role, she identified cost savings of $50,000 in Johns Hopkins recycling program and assisted with negotiations of system-wide waste management contract that saved the Health System $1.1 million annually.

    Mrs. Hayes graduated from Yale University and is currently enrolled in the Doctorate in Public Health in Health Care Management and Leadership at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is a current Board Member for Greater Homewood Community Corporation and the United Way Partnership Board; serves on the Executive Committee of the American Heart Association Go-Red Campaign; and serves as the Continuing Education & Professional Development Chair for the Baltimore Chapter of the National Association of Health Service Executives.

    Pricing

    Member: $0   Non-member: $0

  • Green Build Series: Creating a Sustainable Healthcare Campus: the Intersection of Evidence-based Design, LEED for Healthcare and World Class Objectives

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 11/14/2013: Learn how the Military Health System's World Class guidelines, the US Army Medical Command's sustainability vision, LEED for Healthcare, USGBC Pilot Credits and Evidence-Based Design methodology merged to create a vision for a whole-campus approach to healthcare design.

    Session Description

    Design guidelines are often lengthy and complex and sometimes contradictory. Critical care environments, such as hospitals and clinics, add more layers of requirements. Learn how the Military Health System's World Class guidelines, the US Army Medical Command's sustainability vision, LEED for Healthcare, USGBC Pilot Credits and Evidence-Based Design methodology merged to create a vision for a whole-campus approach to healthcare design.Learning Objectives:Gain insight into how the Evidence-Based Design (EBD) scientific research process was used to develop solutions for energy, water, waste and infection control; how EBD working groups were formed, and understand how the development of these solutions influences an organizational culture shift toward long-term optimization of patient care, staff care, and sustainable facility management.Identify the LEED for Healthcare Credits and USGBC Pilot Credits used in researching chemicals of concern and transparency for architectural and interior product and furniture selections.Understand how research is used to support and inform the project on the use of antimicrobials, their implications for infection control and human and environmental health.

    Learning Objectives

    • Gain insight into how the Evidence-Based Design (EBD) scientific research process was used to develop solutions for energy, water, waste and infection control; how EBD working groups were formed, and understand how the development of these solutions influences an organizational culture shift toward long-term optimization of patient care, staff care, and sustainable facility management.
    • Identify the LEED for Healthcare Credits and USGBC Pilot Credits used in researching chemicals of concern and transparency for architectural and interior product and furniture selections.
    • Understand how research is used to support and inform the project on the use of antimicrobials, their implications for infection control and human and environmental health.

    Presenters

    Jean Hansen, FIIDA, CID, LEED AP, BD+C, AAHID, EDAC, Senior Professional Associate, Sustainable Interiors Manager
    HDR Architecture, Inc.With 30+ years of experience in sustainable design, planning and interior design, Jean is responsible for advancing HDR's sustainability initiatives globally in project and research work for healthcare and institutional environments. She has worked on the development of many nationally recognized sustainable resources, including the USGBC's LEED Healthcare rating system.Robert Phinney, AIA, PMP, ENV SP, LEED AP, BD+C, ID+C, Director, Sustainable Design Services, HDR Architecture, Inc.Robert Phinney, HDR's Director of Sustainable Design Services and an architect with a focus on sustainable design and efficient operations solutions. He leads the diverse team of HDR's Sustainable Design Professionals who manage the LEED process for a range of S+T, Healthcare, Governmental, and University projects. He brings deep experience in implementing sustainable strategies in federal, civic, and healthcare projects as well as policy development assistance to many regional municipalities and organizations.LTC Ross A. Davidson, Director, Project Execution Division, Health Facility Planning AgencyRoss A. Davidson, HFPA's Director of Project Execution Division, oversees a health facility replacement program valued at more than $6.6 billion. He has held various positions throughout his career from planning and programming, design development, construction administration, transition planning and execution, and facility operations.

    Sponsor

    Pricing

    Member: $0 Non-member: $29 Construction Specialties Guest: $0

  • HHI Series: A Deeper Dive - Using HHI to Further Sustainability Agenda at Beaumont Health System

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 11/13/2013: Join us to learn more about Beaumont Health System's robust sustainability program and strategies for ongoing success

    Session Description

    Engaged Leadership is a focus of the Healthier Hospitals Initiative because it 'moves sustainability from basement to boardroom'. Actively engaged leadership is essential to achieving success, and the HHI measures for this challenge are qualitative. Challenge levels 1,2 and 3 are identified by the number of qualitative activities achieved. Organizations that have fully committed to sustainability leadership have adopted ten or more strategies over time. These strategies are grouped into categories - strategic priorities, operational focus, systematic communication, stakeholder engagement.

    As a follow-up to their previous webinar, Beaumont Health System will take participants on a deeper dive of their sustainability strategies that have enmeshed environmental goals as part of their culture. Beaumont Health System has committed to Level 3 of the Engaged Leadership Challenge, and aligned its own goals with those of the Healthier Hospitals Initiative. Join us to learn more about Beaumont Health System's robust sustainability program and strategies for ongoing success!

    Learning Objectives

    • Review the HHI Engaged Leadership Challenge measures
    • Discuss how to create a comprehensive Green and Sustainability Plan.
    • Share how the HHI Challenges have been aligned with Beaumont Health System's sustainability program
    • Highlight various strategies and data for continued sustainability success

    *Participants are encouraged to review Creating a Green Culture through Innovation prior to this webinar!

    Presenter

    Kay WinokurKay Winokur, RN, LEED Green Associate, Vice President Quality, Safety and Accreditation, Beaumont Health System

    Kay Winokur, Vice President, Quality, Safety and Accreditation at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI. This position includes administrative responsibility for Hospital Quality and Accreditation, Patient Safety, Green and Sustainability Initiatives, Radiation Safety, Pharmacy, Employee and Environmental Safety, Infection Control, Hospitality, and Patient Satisfaction.Kay has greater than 30 years of experience as a registered nurse, has a Master’s degree in Health Care Administration, and is certified by the American Society for Quality as a Six Sigma Black Belt. Kay is certified as a Green Consultant by the Green Business League as well as a credentialed LEED Green Associate by the Green Building Certification Institute.

    Beaumont Hospitals were selected as a finalist in The American Hospital Quest for Quality Prize for 2003. This recognition noted the organizations accomplishments in developing a culture of safety that permeates throughout and the commitment by leadership to sustain that cultural change. In 2007, Kay was a co-recipient of the Dean Conley Award (publication award) by the American College of Healthcare Executives. In 2012 Kay’s Green Team was the recipient of the 2012 Detroit Free Press Green Leader Award and 2102 Corp. Magazine 101 Most Sustainable Companies.Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak is a 1,061-bed tertiary care hospital. By number of inpatient admissions it is one of the busiest single hospital facilities in the United States.

    Pricing

    Member: $0   Non-member: $0