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  • SIGNATURE SERIES: Employee engagement and sustainability: Connecting the dots

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/09/2015

    Recorded on 09/09/2015 - Why do companies care about employee engagement? Do sustainability programs provide breakthrough employee engagement opportunities? Using documented examples, Bob Willard will connect the dots between smart sustainability programs, employee engagement, employee productivity and innovation, and company bottom-line results.

    *NEW Signature Series Web-Share Event!*

    Speaker: Bob Willard, Author and Speaker, Sustainability Advantage


    Title: Employee engagement and sustainability: Connecting the dots

    Date: Sept 9, 2pm EST/11am PST

    Description: Four times a year, Practice Greenhealth will feature high-level trainers speaking on cutting edge topics in sustainable health care.Why do companies care about employee engagement? Do sustainability programs provide breakthrough employee engagement opportunities? Using documented examples, Bob Willard will connect the dots between smart sustainability programs, employee engagement, employee productivity and innovation, and company bottom-line results.

    Objectives: By the end of the event attendees should be able to:

    • Describe the three key attributes of an engaged worker – how you'd recognize one if you saw one.
    • Describe three ways to use the organization's environmental and social programs as a catalyst to employee engagement and innovation.
    • Explain why employee engagement in smart sustainability programs is important to company success by explaining the four links in the value chain from effective sustainability programs through to increased company profit.
    • Show how quantifying the value of increased employee engagement / productivity is a critical component of the business case for more proactive sustainability initiatives.

    Flow: 75 Minute Web-Share. Bring your questions and experience!

    Target Audience: HR, Admin, Green Teams, Executives

    Price: PGH Members: $19

    Non-Members: $49

  • Leadership/Advocacy Series: Leading Change by Changing the Way You Lead

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/02/2015

    Recorded on 09/02/2015 - Leading Change by Changing the Way You Lead is a dynamic presentation around the strategy of adopting an engaging leadership style focused on empowering people and developing an inspiring workplace culture.

    Session Description

    Leading Change by Changing the Way You Lead is a dynamic presentation around the strategy of adopting an engaging leadership style focused on empowering people and developing an inspiring workplace culture. Sharing real best practices from growing organizations in the healthcare space, Paul Spiegelman founder of BerylHealth, The Beryl Institute, and now Chief Culture Officer of Stericycle, illustrates how to develop a loyal workforce who will in turn provide a more positive patient experience, which in turn will drive revenue back into your organization. The presentation will also cover how you can change the way you lead by honoring the 10 Cs of Culture, obtaining a base line measurement of your organization's engagement through the CultureIQ quiz, and focusing on your people. Leading Change by Changing the Way You Lead is full of success stories that you can make your own and adopt at your healthcare organization.

    Learning Objectives

    At the completion of this presentation, the participant will be able to:
    • Describe how engaged employees first and foremost are a driver in an overall patient experience strategy
    • Discuss how to lead through your mission, vision, values
    • Describe how to integrate fun into the workplace
    • Describe how to develop a program to show employees you care
    • Discuss the importance of getting involved in the community
    • Explain the importance of hiring for Fit
    • Describe the value of measuring employee engagement and the return on culture

    Presenter


    Paul Spiegelman, Chief Culture Officer, Stericycle

    Paul Spiegelman is Chief Culture Officer of Stericycle, a NASDAQ listed global services organization with 16,000 employees and is the Founder of BerylHealth and The Beryl Institute. Paul also co-founded the Inc. Small Giants Community, an organization that brings together leaders who are focused on values-based business principles.
    As the former CEO of BerylHealth, Paul led a unique, people-centric culture for a company that won nine “best place to work" awards, including the #2 Best Medium Sized Company to Work for in America. Paul was honored with the Ernst & Young 2010 Entrepreneur of the Year award. Paul is a sought-after speaker and author on leadership, employee engagement, entrepreneurship, corporate culture, and customer relationships. He makes frequent radio and TV appearances and writes many articles and columns on culture for business and entrepreneurial trade publications such as Inc. Magazine and Dallas Business Journal. He's written several books on employee engagement and is the New York Times best-selling author of Patients Come Second: Leading Change by Changing the Way you Lead.
    Paul practiced law for two years prior to founding BerylHealth. He holds a bachelor's degree in history from UCLA and a law degree from Southwestern University. To learn more about Paul, please visit www.paulspiegelman.com.

    Pricing

    Members: $0 Nonmembers: $79

  • Sharing Call: Water, Health Care and the Drought of 2015

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/29/2015

    Recorded on 07/29/2015 - The Practice Greenhealth community cares about water, even if pricing in many areas is perversely low. A healthy water supply is essential for heating, cooling and sanitation. Hospitals use a lot of water in these operations and therefore must be good stewards for their community, especially when there is external stressors to the system by record busting drought and heat.

    Description

    The Practice Greenhealth community cares about water, even if pricing in many areas is perversely low. A healthy water supply is essential for heating, cooling and sanitation. Hospitals use a lot of water in these operations and therefore must be good stewards for their community, especially when there is external stressors to the system by record busting drought and heat. California is experiencing the worst drought in history. The Midwest experiences record heat and strong storm systems making water conservation and heating projects part of their overall resiliency planning for disasters. Join this sharing call to learn what two Practice Greenhealth member hospitals are doing to address water shortages and the impact on healthcare. We welcome representatives from NorthShore Hospital System in Chicago and Kaiser Permanente San Jose Medical Center. It is your time to ask questions, share your successes and challenges. The information gleaned in this call will also inform Practice Greenhealth's supportive work for water conservation for our community.

    Speakers

    Michael Fiore, NorthShore University HealthSystem

    Michael is currently the Corporate Director of Environmental Occupational Health & Safety/Sustainability for NorthShore University HealthSystem in Chicago, IL. He has 20 years of experience leading EH&S programs in health care, government, general industry and consulting. Michael holds a Masters in Public Health from the University of Illinois as well as the certified industrial hygienist and safety professional credentials. He is also currently an adjunct lecturer at the University of Illinois-Chicago, where he teaches a graduate level course on Environmental Health and Safety systems and process improvement.

    Cindy Soliday, MS, LCGC

    Cindy Soliday, MS, LCGC has been a practicing genetic counselor for over 30 years and has worked at Kaiser Permanente San Jose Medical Center for almost 20 years. Besides her work as Genetic Counseling Supervisor and more recently as Director of the Genetics Department, Cindy is the co-chair of the KP San Jose Green Team. The Green Team has successfully implemented and supported various green initiatives at the medical center. KP San Jose has been the proud recipient of the Practice Greenhealth Emerald Partner For Change Award for the past two years. We have also received Circle of Excellence Awards in the areas of Water and Food for two years running thanks to the efforts of many throughout the medical center.

    Sharing these accomplishments is Elizabeth Bailey, MS, RD has been a registered dietitian for 17 years and has also worked at Kaiser Permanente for 20 years. In addition to her work as the Director of Food and Nutrition, Elizabeth is the co-chair of the KP San Jose Green Team.

    Also presenting with the Kaiser team is their chief engineer, Keefe Fields.

    * This is a member-only resource.

  • Climate/Energy Series: ​Energy/Climate Greenulances - a Case Study in Alternative Fuel Sources

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/07/2015

    North Shore-LIJ has an ambulance fleet of over 100 vehicles that drive over 2.5 million miles per year, consuming over $1.8 million worth of fuel annually. These ambulances, when deployed, are required to run 24-hours a day, idling in order to maintain all of the on-board systems including controlling the climate for both medicinal purposes and patient comfort.

    Session Description

    North Shore-LIJ has an ambulance fleet of over 100 vehicles that drive over 2.5 million miles per year, consuming over $1.8 million worth of fuel annually. These ambulances, when deployed, are required to run 24-hours a day, idling in order to maintain all of the onboard systems including controlling the climate for both medicinal purposes and patient comfort. In keeping with their sustainability and social responsibility mission, which is focused on improving the health and well-being of its community and society at large, North Shore- LIJ Health System has taken steps in regards to alternate transportation via alternative fuel source emergency vehicles. This session will focus on the benefits and challenges of converting diesel ambulances to CNG, including a step by step case study by the person who created the first two CNG ambulances in the country.

    Learning Objectives

    • Learn about opportunities to utilize alternative fuel vehicles.
    • Discuss the benefits and challenges of converting a diesel ambulance to a compressed natural gas ambulance.
    • Discuss other energy and emission saving transportation initiatives.

    Presenters

    Paul Power, Assistant Director of Operations, North Shore-LIJ Health System

    Center for Emergency Medical Services Paul M. Power, EMT-P, is an Assistant Director of Center for Emergency Medical Services of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, where he oversees the coordination of EMS services in Manhattan and all of capital purchases relating to the EMS operation including a fleet of over 120 vehicles including 100 ambulances. A consummate emergency services professional, Paul brings nearly three decades of experience in both the emergency medical and rescue services arenas. Paul began his supervisory career with the Center for EMS as an operations officer in the interfacility transport division where he was responsible for clinical oversight as well field supervision of the department's EMT's and paramedics. Under his direction, partnerships and cooperative arrangements that are now central to the transportation of patients throughout the health system were forged and nurtured. Paul also leads the EMS Sustainability Committee and is also a part of Lenox Hill Hospital's newly formed green team. Paul designed and purchased the first two successful compressed natural gas ambulances in the country.

    Pricing

    Members: $0 Nonmembers: $79

  • Green Build Series: Gardens in Health Care 101

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/30/2015

    Recorded 06/30/15 - Health care professionals, grounds staff, managers, volunteers and sustainability teams will experience best practices in two Portland, Oregon health care systems. The presenters have a combined 28 years of experience in health care garden design, programming and evaluation.

    Sponsored by image
    This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA credit

    Session Description

    Health care professionals, grounds staff, managers, volunteers, sustainability teams, designers and architects will experience best practices in two Portland, Oregon health care systems. The presenters have a combined 28 years of experience in health care garden design, programming and evaluation. The session opens with the evidence base to support gardens in health care. The evidence informs the interdisciplinary planning process, engagement by all user groups, and the design features. Two garden case studies outline the elements of construction and programming. Maintenance and year-round garden care are highlighted, and resources will be shared for those in the beginning stages of planning and design for the garden as a therapeutic setting to support clinical care.

    Learning Objectives

    • Describe the evidence-base of gardens in health care.
    • Summarize planning process strategies.
    • List 3-5 best practices for successful garden design, implementation and programming.

    Presenters

    Scott Hoffman, BS, Gardener, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

    Scott Hoffman has a B.S. in Horticulture and Environmental Landscaping from the University of MN, Crookston. He is the Gardener with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Portland Health Care System in Portland, OR, and has been with the VA for four years. Additionally, he is also a U.S. Air Force Veteran with six years serving in Japan, Turkey, and Germany.

    He currently is a graduate student at Washington State University studying Healthcare Healing Gardens. His graduate project involves the research, design, and installation of a Healing Garden at the VA Portland Health Care System. He created three separate designs and surveyed the medical center population to see what patients, staff, and visitors preferred in a healing garden. Everyone analyzed each design and voted for their choice. His preliminary findings have found that a native landscape design is best suited for a healing garden. The garden installation began in January 2015, with an opening date scheduled for July 2015. He continues his graduate studies and leading the Portland VA Veterans Healing Garden project. Furthermore, he continues to looks for environmentally friendly and sustainable practices to further improve the medical center campus grounds.

    Teresia Hazen, MEd, HTR, QMHP, Registered Horticultural Therapist, Coordinator of Therapeutic Gardens and HT, Legacy Health

    Teresia M. Hazen, MEd, HTR, QMHP has been with Legacy Health in Portland, Oregon since 1991. Teresia is responsible for pioneering the horticultural therapy program and therapeutic gardens for Legacy's long-term care and skilled nursing patients, in 1991. Today, she oversees ten therapeutic gardens and horticultural therapy work through the Rehabilitation Institute of Oregon, Emanuel Children's Hospital and the Oregon Burn Center. The Good Samaritan Hospital Stenzel Healing Garden was recognized by the American Horticultural Therapy Association Therapeutic Garden Award in 1998. The Children's Hospital Garden received the same honor in 2000 and the Oregon Burn Center Garden in 2006.

    In addition to being a Registered Horticultural Therapist, Ms. Hazen holds a Master of Education degree (M.Ed.), a K – 12 Administrative Credential, and is a Qualified Mental Health Professional (QMHP). The focus of her training has been pediatrics, gerontology, addictions counseling, special education, horticulture and curriculum design.

    Teresia calls upon her extensive, broad-based background to facilitate interdisciplinary garden design teams and to develop therapeutic programs in healthcare gardens. She is also responsible for aspects of fund development, marketing, public relations and volunteer services to sustain the garden programs.

    Teresia served on the American Horticultural Therapy Association Board of Directors from 1995 – 1999. In 2003, the Association recognized her leadership by honoring her with the Rhea McCandliss Professional Service Award. In 2007, the American Horticultural Society awarded Teresia the annual HT award for national leadership. In 2012, the Portland Garden Club recognized her with their “Outstanding Achievement Award." For ten years, she has served as an instructor for the Chicago Botanic Garden Healthcare Garden Design Certificate program and for six years teaching at the University of Washington Certificate in Therapeutic/Healing Gardens program. She has taught, lectured and consulted regarding gardens in healthcare, horticultural therapy for a wide variety of populations, benefits of gardening and nearby nature, therapeutic garden design, participatory design process, and gardens in senior living communities in the US, Japan, Korea, China, Canada, France and Britain.

    Pricing

    Member: $0 Non-member: $79

  • Green Build Series: The Financial Side of Hospital Energy Efficiency

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/25/2015

    Leverage your facility investments by developing a comprehensive energy management plan for your hospital or medical center. Reducing energy usage reduces a hospital's operational costs and carbon footprint.

    Sponsored by
    This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA credit

    Session Description

    Leverage your facility investments by developing a comprehensive energy management plan for your hospital or medical center. Reducing energy usage reduces a hospital's operational costs and carbon footprint. EPA research indicates that hospitals that implement energy conservation measures outperform competing hospitals by as much as 10% in net operating income. By adopting a comprehensive energy management plan, rather than a piecemeal approach, healthcare organizations can ensure that their investments in this area offer the best return on investment.

    Learning Objectives

    • Review 13 steps of a comprehensive energy management plan for a healthcare facility.
    • Understand the high potential return on investment related to reducing healthcare facility energy costs.
    • Learn about benchmarking options and appropriate responses to findings, including retro-commissioning and retrofits.
    • Analyze financing options and local grant/rebate opportunities to pay for studies and upgrades.

    Presenter

    Dan Doyle, Grumman/Butkus Associates, Chairman
    Daniel L. Doyle, P.E., LEED AP O+M, held the position of President of Grumman/Butkus Associates, an energy efficiency consulting and sustainable design engineering firm, from 2000 until 2013. He is now Chairman of the firm, responsible for general management, marketing, and recruiting. He is also the principal-in-charge for numerous designs and studies. Dan's 30-year-plus career has focused on energy conservation and efficiency improvements in new and existing buildings, especially energy-intensive and mission critical facilities such as laboratories, hospitals, data centers, and specialized manufacturing facilities. Dan has received awards from organizations such as the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers and the U.S. Department of Energy for energy-conservation retrofits in existing buildings and for green building design. He is a board member of the International Institute for Sustainable Laboratories.Dan holds a BSME from the University of Illinois.

    Pricing

    Member: $0 Non-member: $79

  • Climate/Energy Series: Health Care's Role in Engaging Patients, Members and Communities on Climate Change

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/09/2015

    Recorded on 06/09/2015 - Climate change is having a direct impact on human health. Rising temperatures and increasing levels of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are impacting everything from the nutritional value of food, vector borne diseases, air quality, and mental and behavioral health. And as with many societal challenges, vulnerable populations are disproportionately affected by these changes.

    Session Description

    Climate change is having a direct impact on human health. Rising temperatures and increasing levels of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are impacting everything from the nutritional value of food, vector borne diseases, air quality, and mental and behavioral health. And as with many societal challenges, vulnerable populations are disproportionately affected by these changes. Despite these connections, collectively the health care community has done little to address the health impacts of climate change. As an industry that has clear and simple communication of uncertain and complex science at its core, there is hope and there is opportunity. Research has shown that people pay attention when climate change is discussed through a public health lens. This workshop will bring together practitioners representing payers, providers and public health to share successful examples of engaging patients and members on climate change mitigation and resilience strategies, exchange communications tools and best practices, and brainstorm a collaborative path forward for the industry to stake a leadership position in community engagement around climate and public health.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand the link between climate change and human health
    • Understand the link between climate change, health disparities and environmental justice
    • Develop strategies for engaging patients, members and communities on climate change resiliency and preparedness
    • Develop opportunities for providers and payers to collaborate on climate change advocacy and communications

    Presenters

    Jackie Yerby, Sustainability Program Manager, Cambia Health Solutions

    Jackie Yerby is responsible for sustainability strategy and implementation at Cambia Health Solutions, a health solutions company based in Portland, Oregon that is dedicated to transforming health care by creating a person-focused and economically sustainable system. Jackie's work touches on everything from recycling and waste reduction to promoting active transportation to addressing health disparities. She serves on the Multnomah County Advisory Committee on Sustainability and Innovation (ACSI) and on the boards of the Community Cycling Center and Women in Sustainability and the Environment (WISE). She is a certified Master Recycler. Jackie holds an undergraduate degree in History from Yale University, and a Master of Public Policy degree from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. She is currently working toward a certificate in social entrepreneurship from Portland State University.

    Monica Nakielski, Project Manager, Sustainable Initiatives, Partners HealthCare

    Monica Nakielski and the Partners Sustainable Initiatives team are responsible for providing vision and leadership in the development and implementation of the Partners sustainability strategy encompassing energy, waste, chemical, product supply chain and food. Nakielski earned her MBA from the Simmons School of Management and a BS in Medical Microbiology and Immunology from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. As former member of the United States Air Force she holds government security clearance and is fluent in Spanish, proficient in Portuguese. Prior to Partners HealthCare Nakielski led a management consulting firm specialized in sustainability. She was a management consultant and lead for sustainability at Palladium, (formerly Balanced Scorecard Collaborative) with Drs. Kaplan and Norton, developers of the Balanced Scorecard management system where Nakielski partnered with Fortune 1000 clients to make the link between sustainability principles and strategy, planning and alignment, performance management and communications and reporting.

    Kari Lyons-Eubanks, Policy Analyst, Multnomah County Environmental Health Services

    Kari Lyons-Eubanks coordinates policy advocacy and analysis efforts in the areas of local and state housing codes, regulations, laws and climate action plans. She serves on the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) Climate Change work. She earned her Master in International and Intercultural Management from the School for International Training and her B.A. from the University of Rhode Island.

    Kyle Cahill, Senior Manager of Corporate Citizenship, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

    Kyle is Senior Manager of Corporate Citizenship at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts where he is responsible for the company's sustainability strategy, programs focused on improving the environmental health of members and MA communities, and sustainability collaborations within the broader health care industry. Prior to Blue Cross Blue Shield, Kyle was Senior Program Officer at Oxfam America, leading the organization's work on poverty foot printing, a process for organizations to measure, analyze and improve their impacts on communities. Prior to joining Oxfam, Kyle was Director of Corporate Engagement at Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) where he worked with the private sector on environmental initiatives addressing climate change, safer products and materials, water use and waste reduction. Kyle earned his M.B.A. focused in social responsibility from the Isenberg School at the Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst and his B.A. from Amherst College.

    Pricing

    Members: $0 Non-members: $29

  • Green Build Series: Case Study of an Investigation into Insufficient Exhaust Systems in a Hospital Environment

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/28/2015

    Recorded on 5/28/2015 - This case study demonstrates the deployment of video-equipped robots into the air ducts of a major medical center which resulted in the discovery that the newly upgraded exhaust systems were designed without due consideration of existing systems.

    Sponsored by

    Session Description

    This case study demonstrates the deployment of video-equipped robots into the air ducts of a major medical center which resulted in the discovery that the newly upgraded exhaust systems were designed without due consideration of existing systems. This resulted in a series of duct system failures that impacted both quality of care and energy usage. Even though test and balancing was performed and the project was deemed to be complete, exhaust flow from hospital spaces such as isolation, patient room bathrooms, and general exhaust was still insufficient. Chelsea Group was retained to investigate, identify, and offer solutions and budgetary estimates to correct deficient exhaust airflow. When hospitals plan changes, those changes need to work with the whole system and building.

    Learning Objectives

    • Learn a systematic approach to evaluating exhaust system shortfalls
    • See how new technology provides important investigative tools
    • See why jumping to obvious conclusions can create additional problems

    Presenter

    150528 Dave Munn.jpgDave Munn, Chief Technical Officer at Chelsea Group, Ltd.,

    Dave has over 40 years of design and engineering background with extensive experience in reviewing and overseeing capital improvement programs in existing buildings. He has knowledge of national standards and regulations, and experience with building mechanical system design and operation. At Chelsea Group, Mr. Munn has designed several high profile projects demonstrating advanced ventilation techniques and technology innovations. Mr. Munn's work experience has focused on project management in the construction, consulting, energy services, and indoor air quality industries. Mr. Munn served on the project team for developing the indoor environmental elements of the LEED certification process for the World Trade Center 7 project. He has taken the lead in a wide range of property condition assessment and problem solving projects for Morgan Stanley's national portfolio of buildings. He led operations in the verification of clean-up and recommissioning of buildings following a major flood at the University of Hawaii. He recently commissioned the installation of two new chillers (5,620 and 2,800 tons) with four new system pumps, including a 600 hp condenser water pump, for the University of Illinois at Champagne/Urbana. Munn has also provided support in meeting LEED requirements for projects needing energy audits, retrocommissioning, and ASHRAE 62 requirements. For buildings seeking to receive the US EPA ENERGY STAR label, Mr. Munn also provides support to verify compliance, accuracy, and complete the application.
    Mr. Munn has led teams in major air handler replacements and retrofits at dozens of healthcare facilities throughout the United States. Beginning in 2008, Chelsea Group initiated work with a major medical center in Hawaii on a project that evaluated the OR Air Handling Units and recommended revised control strategies that have successfully extended the life of those systems, albeit temporarily. In 2013, Mr. Munn and his team conducted an assessment of all exhaust systems identifying necessary corrections to provide proper functionality of those systems and improvements to provide trouble-free operation of the systems over the long term.
    As an extension of that work, Chelsea Group was requested to likewise evaluate the supply and outdoor air components of the HVAC systems to provide a roadmap for a long term solution through a 5-year capital improvement program. That project was completed in FY2014 and implementation is beginning in FY2015. Work on these projects will be done in parallel and coordinated to minimize intrusion in the operations of the medical center. As part of the Chelsea Group Sustainability Management Program, Mr. Munn conducts on-site investigation of facilities to determine where the best potential energy savings lie, and how a property can best implement such practices. He then assists the property in developing a cap-ex plan based on the energy audit to prioritize what should be implemented first. He then can support to the facilities with implementation of the recommended measures.
    Mr. Munn is registered as a professional engineer (PE) in the states of Arizona, Hawaii, and Illinois, and was a licensed general contractor in Arizona. He is also a Certified Energy Manager (CEM) and LEED-AP. He is a past president of the Arizona Chapter of the Association of Energy Engineers (AEE) and serves on the Chapter's Board of Directors. He was awarded the Region V Energy Engineer of the Year by AEE in 2009, and is the co-chair of the Green Buildings Committee of the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) Phoenix. Mr. Munn is a member of the Building Commissioning Association, is a Certified Building Commissioning Professional, and holds a mechanical engineering degree from the University of Illinois – Chicago.

    Pricing

    Member: $0 Nonmember: $29 Construction Specialties Guest: $0
  • Greening the Supply Chain Series: No More Excuses: Breaking Down Barriers to Achieve Significant Reprocessing Savings

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recorded on 5/28/2015 - Over the past decade, the acceptance and popularity of third-party reprocessing of single-use medical devices (SUD) has grown dramatically. This success is largely driven by the program's ability to safely prevent thousands of tons of medical waste from going into landfills and save healthcare systems hundreds of millions of dollars every year.

    Session Description

    Over the past decade, the acceptance and popularity of third-party reprocessing of single-use medical devices (SUD) has grown dramatically. This success is largely driven by the program's ability to safely prevent thousands of tons of medical waste from going into landfills and save healthcare systems hundreds of millions of dollars every year. The combined environmental and financial benefits have helped SUD reprocessing become one of the single most influential sustainability initiatives currently undertaken by US hospitals – so why isn't every hospital reprocessing? This panel session will identify the most common barriers facility leaders face in implementing and maintaining a successful SUD reprocessing program, including useful tips from hospital leaders that will help any type of healthcare facility overcome them.

    Learning Objectives

    • Examine key drivers of the continued growth of SUD reprocessing
    • Identify tactics to navigate complicated organizational systems and to overcome reprocessing resistance
    • Uncover SUD contracting dynamics that may limit your savings potential
    • Recognize new ways to maximize your existing program's savings long-term
    • Learn how to replicate successful reprocessing programs across multiple facilities

    Presenters

    Ellen Cleary, RN, BSN, MBA, CNOR, Director of Surgical and Endoscopic Services Edward HospitalAs the Director of Surgical and Endoscopic Services at Edward Hospital, Ellen has full clinical and financial responsibility over surgery, endoscopy, sterile processing and anesthesia. She began her career in nursing 24 years ago and has been at Edward Hospital for the past 3 years. She initiated the recycling and reprocessing program in surgery with Stryker Sustainability Solutions shortly after joining Edward Hospital. The program began in June 2012 and has netted considerable savings and diversion of garbage from landfills since.

    Major Wendy H. Wilkins, RN, BSN, MSN, CNOR, Operating Room Flight Commander, Surgical Services Flight, Misawa Air Base, Japan
    Major Wilkins is the Operating Room Flight Commander currently assigned to the 35th Surgical Operations Squadron, 35th Medical Group, Misawa Air Base, Japan. As the AF SG?s Cost Conscious Culture Champion for the AF Recycling Program, she works in collaboration with other healthcare professionals to provide a multidisciplinary approach to positive changes in the surgical environment, including implementing single-use device reprocessing programs.
    Major Wilkins completed her nursing degree in 1995 at Meridian Community College and has served numerous roles as an OR staff nurse, manager, OR Support Element Chief, and Operating Room Flight Commander. Prior to her current assignment she was the 96 MDG Executive Officer at Eglin AFB Florida and the Nurse Manager over Vascular/Thoracic Surgery. Prior to her current assignment to Japan, she was the Surgical Operations Flight Commander at Keesler Air Force Base.

    Erin Broeske, Director, Corporate Accounts, Stryker Sustainability Solutions
    As director of corporate accounts for Stryker Sustainability Solutions, the leading provider of reprocessing and re-manufacturing services for medical devices, Erin serves as a key partner to hospitals, IDNs and GPOs helping them advance their individual sustainability goals. Prior to joining Stryker, Erin served as Director of Market Research Operations for brand strategy firm, Six Degrees and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in global business from Arizona State University.

    Pricing

    Member: $0 Non-member: $0

  • HHI Series: 3 MBA Students Take on HHI Challenge at Seattle Children's Hospital

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/27/2015

    Recorded on 5/27/2015 - 3 MBA Students. 9 Months. One Sustainability Challenge. Find out what happened! Seattle Children's Hospital has pioneered a Sustainability Fellowship Program in partnership with Pinchot University's Bainbridge Graduate Institute.

    Session Description

    3 MBA Students. 9 Months. One Sustainability Challenge. Find out what happened! Seattle Children's Hospital has pioneered a Sustainability Fellowship Program in partnership with Pinchot University's Bainbridge Graduate Institute. Bainbridge Graduate Institute is the first business school in the country to offer an MBA in Sustainable Business. BGI's mission is to prepare learners from diverse backgrounds to design, lead and evolve enterprises that contribute to the common good. Graduates from BGI are experts at moving organizations towards profitability and responsibility at the same time. Through a competitive process three candidates were selected to spend nine months working on a sustainability challenge at Seattle Children's Hospital. This year, the program focused on three of the Healthier Hospital Initiative Challenges: Safer Chemicals Challenge, Healthier Foods - Local/Sustainable Food Challenge, and the Balanced Menus Challenges. Learn about the challenges and successes of three business school students working for nine months to super-charge a hospital's sustainability performance. Can your hospital partner with a graduate program to take your sustainability program to the next level? Find out how directly from this year's class of Sustainability Fellows at Seattle Children's Hospital.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand how to partner with educational institutions to super-charge hospital sustainability programs.
    • Understand the process of stakeholder engagement, community engagement, and the systems change necessary to transition to hyper-local food sourcing
    • Identify key metrics to track local and sustainable foods
    • Through the challenges of an MBA student who embedded for nine months in the sourcing department, understand the process of benchmarking and learn the useful tools that could be implemented in your operations.

    Presenters

    Liz Smith, MBA Candidate, June 2015,Seattle Children's/Pinchot University

    As an MBA candidate of Bainbridge Graduate Institute at Pinchot University, it is Liz's belief that holistic health and nutrition begin with the food on our plate; and the wholesomeness of that food is dependent upon the care with which it was grown, transported, and prepared. Liz works at the intersection between agriculture and healthcare. It is her mission to strengthen local economies by providing farmers with viable markets, while simultaneously strengthening the healthcare system by bringing nourishing, sustainably produced food into Hospital kitchens. This mission is strengthened by a working knowledge of the food system across the supply chain. She has a graduate certificate in Sustainable Food and Agriculture Systems from Pinchot University, two years' experience working at the intersection of technology and food with her tech startup, and over seven years' experience working alongside farmers, community builders, and makers doing grassroots community development. The healthcare system has an amazing opportunity to partner with the leaders of their regional food system, in turn creating holistic resiliency in the health and wellbeing of the communities they serve. If this is a conversation you are interested in engaging in, please contact Liz during the conference.

    Aric Ho, Academic Sponsor, Pinchot University

    Aric believes that understanding multiple perspectives is critical to systemic change. Over the past 17 years, he has intentionally shaped his career to gain experience in several industries including: healthcare, higher education, IT, emergency services, and hospitality, to name a few. Now, he uses his diverse perspectives and skills to foster trust and innovation among stakeholders, which he believes is critical to survival and prosperity. He is currently the Academic Sponsor and Program Manager for Pinchot University, helping them to build synergistic relationships with local organizations, including Seattle Children's Hospital. He also helps teach two courses, Organizational Leadership, and Leadership & Personal Development at Pinchot University. He strives to create a world where people, organizations, and the planet can thrive and live in abundance.

    Anthony Gromko, MBA Candidate, June 2015, Seattle Children's/Pinchot University

    Anthony Gromko has worked both locally and abroad to create positive systemic change at the community level for the past 12 years. He currently works with Mercy Corps Northwest, a nonprofit that strives to build more just, productive, and resilient communities in Oregon and Washington through community economic development. Anthony leads the organization's efforts in new program development, resource management and stewardship, community integration, and stakeholder engagement in Washington. He is currently completing his MBA in Sustainable Systems from Bainbridge Graduate Institute (BGI) at Pinchot University. Over the past year, Anthony has participated in collaboration between Pinchot University and Seattle Children's Hospital to advance the Healthier Hospital Initiative's Smarter Purchasing-EPEAT Challenge and to establish a green purchasing program with Children's strategic sourcing team. Adminstration/Finance/Leadership

    Kevin Adams, MBA Candidate, June 2015, Seattle Children's/Pinchot University

    Kevin has 7 years' experience working in environmental management and stakeholder engagement. He has collaborated with federal, state and municipal teams to engage multifaceted issues such as oil spill emergency response, ecological restoration, fisheries management and community outreach. After working for the the National Marine Fisheries Service and Office of Habitat Restoration he set his sights on creating positive change in the business world. He believes every player in the seafood supply chain, from fishers to distributors and consumers, holds powerful potential for stewardship of our marine resources. His passion lies in developing community partnerships to redefine our relationship with seafood. Kevin is presently pursuing his MBA in Sustainable Systems from Bainbridge Graduate Institute at Pinchot University with a focus in supply chain management and food and agricultural systems.

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